All Posts By

Michelle Sabino

Material Consult Parent Consult Speech Consult

The Parent Dilemma: Effectively Changing Activities

I recently came across this post in a mommy group:

“Ok ladies! There has to be a better way. I fight with my preschooler from 7:30-8 to eat breakfast and then from 8-8:15 to get dressed. I end up so upset and frustrated. What has worked for you to make mornings easier?”

The clinician in me asks the following questions:

What does your language sound like when giving directions to your child?

THIS? “Ok, mommy needs to get ready. We need to leave. Eat your breakfast, then get dressed, so mommy can get to work!” 

OR THAT? “First eat, then dress….dress, then go to school.”

What prompts are you using so that your little one understands when to change activities?

  • Picture Schedule (eating, dressing, car ride)
  • Timers (phone timer, oven timer, etc.)
  • Counting down (5 more minutes then…  1 more minute and all done [eating, dressing, etc.])

Does your child typically follow basic directions?

  • Give me ball
  • Put shoes on
The Takeaway:

  1. When speaking with little ones, we must first understand that that we are in fact talking to little ones. Too many words can get lost in their ability to process what you want. Shorten your statements.
  2. In order to establish a routine, you might consider using strategies that set the expectation (visual aids, timers, verbal reminders).
  3. If your child is struggling with understanding language, they may appear as being non-compliant, when in reality they need help understanding language. If this is the case, you may want to consider a speech & language evaluation.
Material Consult Parent Consult Speech Consult

Enter the Speech Room: For Parents and Speech Therapists

What are you going to do about your child not talking?

I left the world of speech therapy (following 12 years of practice) and pursuing my PhD, to be a stay at home mom. Having my daughter as my only client has it’s perks. I can work with her when I want. All daily activities are an opportunity for learning. Plus, I was able to join a variety of local mommy and social media Speech Therapist groups.  Something troubled me. The same questions continued to present themselves over and over again.

  1. My child is not talking. What is normal?
  2. I’m a speech therapist and I feel like I’m just chasing some of my children around the room the ENTIRE session (for those treating children diagnosed with behavioral difficulties).

Then I saw this:

72% of internet users say they looked online for health information within the past year.  Resource

And so you have this blog…the inner workings of my brain…to share my knowledge by providing:

  • Communication Tips and Strategies
  • Parent Friendly education
  • Strategies for dealing with behaviors
  • Obtaining Instructional control (for my SLP colleagues)
  • SLP quick references
  • and Product reviews

Material Consult Parent Consult Speech Consult

Launching: The Speech Consultant

Sound DevelopmentLast year I authored the article What Sounds Should My Child be Able to Say? In doing so, a number of families, including my peers, have been able to successfully utilize this information as a visual to understanding and presenting overall sound development integrated from sources such as Poole, Sander, Hena, Fudula, Templin, and Wellman.

Thank you to everyone who continues to share the post and who have provided positive feedback.

In the next few weeks, I will launch my blog: The Speech Room. My goal is to continue to bring quick research-based reads in areas such as:

  • Communication Tips and Strategies
  • Parent Friendly education
  • Strategies for dealing with behaviors
  • Obtaining Instructional control (for my SLP colleagues)
  • SLP quick references
  • and Product reviews

Have an area you’d like for me to touch on? You can forward your idea by clicking hereTo receive the latest blog posts, subscribe to the mailing list below. 

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